It Was My Impression The Current Administration Has Always Supported Greater Regulation!

Please correct me if I am wrong, but I recall that ever since President Obama took office in 2009–in the midst of the housing crisis; failed savings and loans and with the legacy of Enron still looming fresh in the memories of stockholders everywhere– he has said more government regulation through stricter laws and scrutiny (among a host of other burdensome and expensive supposed remedies) was necessary to protect the consumer and public in general. Now–in a narrative of unabashed hypocrisy his administration speaks out and intervenes to prevent Texas’s Governor Rick Perry from doing that very thing.

 
Perry directed the Texas Department of Insurance to establish strict rules to regulate Navigators trained to help Texans purchase health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (These rules are outlined in our feature article below.) Remember – when you go through one these Navigators to enroll in an ACA compliant health plan for an effect date of January 1 – you will be required to divulge your income; your birth date; social security number; address; credit card and checking account information. Do you really want just anyone taking this information? Do you really want the person taking it to not be subject to criminal and financial background checks? Insurance agents licensed in the State of Texas are subject to all these requirements. Why would the administration which always argues for more protection of the individual from the misfeasance, malfeasance and just plain greed of the big corporations, e.g., health insurance companies – now be opposed to such? Why is this regulation so suddenly a liability? Please weigh in and help me understand this. The arguments presented by the fed below do not.

 
Admin. – Kenton Henry
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Feature Article
The Texas Tribune
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
Perry Directs TDI to Regulate Federal Navigator Program
Gov. Rick Perry has directed the Texas Department of Insurance to establish strict rules to regulate so-called navigators trained to help Texans purchase health coverage under Obamacare.
While the governor says the extra regulations will ensure that people handling Texans’ private financial and health information are properly trained and qualified, the rules could present a significant roadblock to organizations helping to implement the federal Affordable Care Act.
“This is blatant attempt to add cumbersome requirements to the navigator program and deter groups from working to inform Americans about their new health insurance options and help them enroll in coverage,” Fabien Levy, a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, said in an email.
Along with many other provisions in President Obama’s signature health reform law, the individual mandate to purchase health insurance is set to take effect on Jan. 1. Texas’ Republican majority, which vehemently opposes the federal health law, declined to establish a state-based insurance marketplace. The federal government is doing it instead, launching an Orbitz-like online insurance exchange starting Oct. 1. That exchange will require individuals to input sensitive tax information, including their Social Security numbers and estimated annual income, to determine whether they qualify for tax credits to purchase coverage.
To help uninsured Texans use the complicated new system, the federal government awarded nearly $11 million in August to local organizations charged with hiring and training navigators, who will help consumers input their financial information and pick a health plan through in the exchange, must undergo 20 to 30 hours of training, pass a certification test and renew their certification annually, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
For Perry, those ground rules are not enough.
“The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has repeatedly delayed explaining how its navigators were going to be created, how they were going to operate and how they were going to be regulated,” Perry wrote in a letter to Insurance Commissioner Julia Rathgeber. “Because of the nature of navigators’ work and because they will be collecting confidential information, including birth dates, social security numbers and financial information, it is imperative that Texas train navigators on the collection and security of such data.”
In the letter, Perry specifically directed TDI to establish rules that require navigators to complete at minimum of 40 hours of state training in addition to the federal training requirements. He also demanded that navigators pass a rigorous exam based on that training, refrain from influencing a consumer’s insurance choice by recommending a specific plan or comparing benefits offered by different plans, and submit to periodic background and regulatory checks and show state identification while on the job.
He also directed TDI to maintain a database of registered navigators, including background checks and fingerprints; set limits on when and where navigators can enroll people in the exchange; charge fees to provide navigator training and registration; and establish the department’s authority to suspend or revoke navigators’ registration for failing to comply with state requirements.
“TDI agrees that the navigators in Texas have to be well trained and competent in what they’re doing,” said Ben Gonzalez, an agency spokesman. “Our goal is for them to be accountable and be conscientious about the confidential information that they’re going to be collecting.”
Federal officials said some of the rules Perry ordered the state insurance department to implement are forbidden under U.S. law. For example, navigators are not allowed to retain or report information on consumers who sign up for coverage through the exchange; therefore, they could not submit that information to TDI, as Perry has requested. The federal agency also emphasized that navigators are not allowed to access consumers’ information after it has been submitted to the exchange.
Levy said the U.S. government has similar programs already set up to help counsel people applying for Medicare, and that those have “never faced this kind of bullying from Texas.”
“This is clearly an ideologically-driven attempt to prevent the uninsured from gaining health coverage,” Levy said. “But despite the state’s attempts, we are confident that navigators will still be able to help Texans enroll in quality, affordable health coverage when open enrollment begins on Oct. 1.”
Given the governor’s directive, the department will begin putting together the rules with some urgency, Gonzalez added. The rule-making process can take several weeks, as the state is required to hold public meetings and solicit stakeholder input before the rules are drafted. After a draft is approved, the rules must be posted on the Texas Register to receive official comment before they can be codified.
“It’s our expectation the rules and training be in place by Jan. 1, when insurance can be purchased through the exchange,” Rich Parsons, a spokesman for the governor’s office, said via email.
The federal health exchange has a six-month open enrollment period — from Oct. 1 to March 31 — in which navigators can help the uninsured find health coverage to comply with the insurance mandate. Individuals who do not purchase insurance during the open enrollment period could be subject to federal tax penalties. If the state’s regulations take effect on Jan. 1, the navigators will be required to undergo additional training during the open enrollment period, which could present significant challenges.
To address the privacy concerns raised about the navigator program, some grant recipients are already requiring navigators to undergo additional training on privacy protection. United Way of Tarrant County, in collaboration with 17 other organizations, received $5.8 million, the largest federal navigator grant in Texas. Tim McKinney, the organization’s chief executive officer, said the organization is requiring navigators to undergo an additional hour-and-a-half of training on how to comply with the federal privacy law HIPAA.
Lawmakers signed off on Perry’s call for greater regulation of the navigator program in the last legislative session when they passed Senate Bill 1795, which authorizes TDI “to regulate navigators if it determined that federal standards did not ensure they were qualified to perform their duties or avoid conflicts of interest,” according to a legislative report. The new state law allows the department to enact rules that protect patient privacy and prohibit navigators from accepting payments from health insurance companies or posing as an insurance agent. At least 16 other states have also enacted or are considering laws to regulate navigators, according to a USA Today report.
Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott and 12 other state attorneys general have also raised concerns that the federal navigator program could pose risks to patients’ privacy. In a letter sent to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in August, the attorneys general asserted that the federal government’s screening process does not require uniform background or fingerprint checks, meaning convicted criminals or identity thieves could become navigators. They also expressed concerns that navigators would not undergo sufficient training.
Some medical professionals and advocates have objected to the privacy concerns raised by conservatives, suggesting they are politically motivated. For example, navigators must already comply with state and federal laws governing the privacy of sensitive medical information. If they do not adhere to strict security and privacy standards, including how to handle and safeguard consumers’ Social Security numbers and identifiable information, they are subject to criminal and civil penalties at both the federal and state level. The federal government imposes up to a $25,000 civil penalty for violating its privacy and security standards.
This story was produced in partnership with Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.


http://allplaninsurance.com

Navigator Vs. Insurance Broker: Who To Go To For Your New Affordable Care Act Health Insurance?

By Kenton Henry, Administrator

 
Let me preface this article with an admission. I am a health insurance broker and have been for 27 years. So consider that as you weigh the comparison suggested in the title of this piece.

 
Very shortly (October 1 to be exact) you are going to be able to enroll in a new Affordable Care Act (ACA) compliant health insurance plan to be effective January 1. Having health insurance at that time is no longer an option – it is a mandate. You probably know this by now and there is no need to review the details and I will not be addressing the penalties for not having coverage next year and beyond. Rather, I will be addressing your options for enrolling and factors you might want to weigh before electing the path you take to enrollment. I will strive to be as objective as possible in light of my preface.

 
First, let’s consider going through an insurance agent or broker like myself. Before I could consider selling my first health insurance policy back in 1986, I had to study for and pass my state’s insurance exam in order to obtain my license. I did this initially in Indiana and again in 1991 when I moved to Texas. While not the Bar Exam or Medical Board Exams – on both occasions they were comprehensive tests and I recall spending weeks of self-study in the quiet of the local library for the first and–after 5 years of experience–another week and a 40 hour prep course to boot for the second. They covered my knowledge of things not the benefit of common sense–and they were certainly not IQ tests–but measured my grasp of esoteric insurance laws, regulations, the principles and components of insurance and ethics among other topics. Next, I had to be appointed with an insurance company before I could represent their products. In addition to an application, an appointment entailed a thorough background and credit check. Approximately twenty years ago, every company with whom I applied to for an appointment made it mandatory I purchase errors and omissions coverage just as required of your attorney or doctor. Every person is fallible and the insurance makes certain an agent’s clients can be compensated for any negligence or unintentional mistake on the agent’s part resulting in the client’s harm. Fortunately, I have never had to file a claim with my E & O company nor have I had a complaint filed against me with a state insurance commission. I must also undergo and complete a minimum of 30 hours of continuing education every 24 months in order to keep my license. A record of this is made the State Insurance Commissioner. My license binds me to the same rules and regulations regarding my client’s privacy, confidentiality and personal information as the aforementioned professionals with whom you share the same type of information. Any compromise in it could result in revocation of my license not to mention civil liability on my part.

 
Who pays for these tests, licenses, continuing education and insurance? I do. It comes out of my personal income. Not to mention the cost of all my supplies, office overhead and gas utilized in seeing my clients at their convenience. Oh yeah . . . and I pay for my own health insurance. And I have never minded these expenses. These are merely the costs of doing business and I was happy to pay them when compared to the alternative which would have required being someone’s employee. So these are pretty much the facts as to my professional background, what is required of me and the protection afforded you by such.

 
Before contrasting this with the alternative – consider:
“The 2010 (ACA) law is intended to prod millions of Americans to buy health insurance, many for the first time. Those seeking coverage must provide details on citizenship, family size and income to determine whether they’re eligible for subsidies, and complete a form that can stretch to seven pages.” – Bloomberg 08.23.13

 
And the alternative to licensed agent or broker? As of October 1st, you will also have the option of going through a “Navigator” hired by your state and whose compensation will be subsidized with federal funds. (Clue: federal funds is code for your tax dollars). The Navigator’s job is to be educate you as to your options and help you elect one before being turned over to an enroller, otherwise known as a customer service representative. The latter will make this happen mechanically and it will most likely be accomplished by you going to a link and completing an electronic enrollment form estimated to be up to 21 pages or greater in length. (We don’t know yet. They and the premiums for coverage are yet to be released.)

 
While the requirements will vary from state to state, the federal requirements for Navigators are 20 hours of training. The federal health insurance exchange will apply in Texas, Indiana and Ohio. These are three of four states where I am licensed. There will be no background checks involved in the hiring process for Navigators as we are told there is no time for such. The administration says “we need to get as many people as possible to sign up as quickly as possible.” The Navigators will not be licensed. They will not pay for errors and omissions insurance. You will pay for their supplies, their insurance and their benefits.

 
I certainly don’t have to be your agent but these are factors you might want to consider before seeking assistance in enrolling in your new health insurance plan. If you feel I have unfairly or otherwise misrepresented things, please feel free to comment as much. In the feature articles below, some opposing or off-setting opinions are expressed–mostly by administration officials.

 

 

Admin. – Kenton Henry

 
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Coming Articles: Biggest Traps of the Affordable Care Act for Medicare Recipients
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Feature Articles:

 
BLOOMBERG August 23, 2013

 
State Laws Hinder Obamacare Effort to Enroll Uninsured
By Alex Nussbaum & Alex Wayne – Aug 23, 2013 2:32 PM CT

 
New laws passed by a dozen Republican-led states, the latest in Missouri last month, may make that harder, imposing licensing exams, fines that can run as high as $1,000 and training that almost doubles the hours required by the federal government. Republicans say the measures will protect consumers. Obamacare supporters say they’ll undermine the effort to get as many people as possible enrolled.
The rules are “like voter intimidation,” said Sara Rosenbaum, a health law professor at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., who supports Obama’s act. “In many, many cases these laws may be a direct interference with outreach assistance and that’s going to be quite serious.”
The Obama administration awarded 105 grants last week, steering money to hospitals, social-service agencies, local clinics and other groups. The navigators are meant to offer “unbiased information” to help people through the complexities of the new system, with its deductibles, copays, provider networks and tax credits, according to an Aug. 15 statement from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
October Deadline
The grants were issued barely a month before the online exchanges are scheduled to open for enrollment on Oct. 1. The administration has said about 7 million people may enroll next year and it needs to motivate millions of young, healthy customers to sign up to keep the markets financially stable.
The state laws may complicate that task. The restrictions go farthest in a handful of states like Georgia and Missouri, where Republican legislators have already refused to set up the new insurance websites or spend money to promote the law.
In Florida this week, Governor Rick Scott told a Miami audience that federal privacy protections for consumers working with navigators were “behind schedule and inadequate.” He urged people to use brokers and agents instead.
Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, a Republican, believes navigators need state regulation because they’ll give advice on “a highly complicated and highly important topic,” his spokesman, Brian Robinson, said in an e-mail. They will also handle personal information that is open to abuse.
Consumer Protection
“This is a consumer protection issue more than anything,” said Kenneth Statz, an insurance broker on the legislative council of the National Association of Health Underwriters, a Washington-based group representing agents and brokers. “We just want to make sure that somebody who is sitting down with a consumer, trying to help them make this major decision, is going to be properly prepared.”
The state laws have passed with the backing of insurance agents and brokers, who view the online exchanges as competition and navigators as potential rivals with an unfair advantage absent new rules.
States require agents to be licensed and undergo periodic training, said Statz, who’s based in Brecksville, Ohio. He also has to carry insurance to protect clients who may be hurt by bad advice or malpractice, he said.
The 2010 law is intended to prod millions of Americans to buy health insurance, many for the first time. Those seeking coverage must provide details on citizenship, family size and income to determine whether they’re eligible for subsidies, and complete a form that can stretch to seven pages.
Federal Requirements:
While states controlled by Democrats such as Maryland, New York, Minnesota and Illinois have also passed rules, these generally follow federal requirements, said Mark Dorley, a health-policy researcher at George Washington University.
Other states have been more restrictive.
Georgia’s navigators need a license from the insurance commissioner. Each person assisting the uninsured has to pay a $50 application fee, complete 35 hours of training — 15 more than the federal requirement — pass an exam, and complete a criminal background check. Licenses must be renewed every year, requiring another $50 and 15 more hours of training.
Missouri defines navigators more broadly than the federal government, said Andrea Routh, executive director of the Missouri Health Advocacy Alliance in Jefferson City. Violating certification requirements risks a $1,000 fine.
Seeking License
Routh’s group, which seeks to educate people on the health law, didn’t apply for a grant. It may seek a license just to be safe, she said.
“Anyone who does outreach and education, or anybody who assists anyone with enrollment had better be checking that law to see if they need to be licensed,” she said.
Missouri voters approved a ballot initiative last year barring Governor Jay Nixon, a Democrat, from setting up the exchange without the assent of the Republican-controlled legislature, which has declined to act so far.
The rules may scare off churches, clinics or others who want to help, said Cindy Zeldin, executive director of Georgians for a Healthy Future. The Atlanta-based nonprofit was part of a group that won a $2.1 million grant.
Georgia’s law implies “navigators are somehow problematic,” she said in a telephone interview, “rather than that they’re groups that likely have a history of working in communities and are trusted.”
‘In Conversations’
The Obama administration has been “in conversations with states” to ensure their laws don’t hinder the effort, said Chiquita Brooks-Lasure, a deputy director at the federal health department, in an Aug. 15 conference call with reporters.
The federal law doesn’t require background checks, though navigators must provide quarterly reports and can lose their grants in cases of fraud or abuse. The administration is requiring them to undergo an initial 20 hours of training.
Some people opposed to Obama’s overhaul “want to see it fail,” said Missouri Health’s Routh. “If you put a lot of barriers in place that make it tough for nonprofits to go out and educate people and assist them in understanding the exchange, that may be one way to have it fail.”
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The Washington Post
Health and Science
States scramble to get health-care law’s insurance marketplaces up and running
By Sarah Kliff and Sandhya Somashekhar, Published: August 24
With a key deadline approaching, state officials across the country are scrambling to get the Affordable Care Act’s complex computer systems up and running, reviewing contingency plans and, in some places, preparing for delays.
Oct. 1 is the scheduled launch date for the health-care law’s insurance marketplaces — online sites where uninsured people will be able to shop for coverage, sometimes using a government subsidy to purchase a plan. An estimated 7 million people are expected to use these portals to purchase health coverage in 2014.
The task is unprecedented in its complexity, requiring state and federal data systems to transmit reams of information between one another. Some officials in charge of setting up the systems say that the tight deadlines have forced them to take shortcuts when it comes to testing and that some of the bells and whistles will not be ready.
“There’s a certain level of panic about how much needs to be accomplished but a general sense that the bare minimum to get the system functional will be done,” said Matt Salo, executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors. “It will by no means be as smooth and as seamless as people expected.”
Oregon announced this month that it will delay consumers’ direct access to its marketplace, opening the Web site only to brokers and consumer-assistance agents in order to shield consumers from opening-day glitches.
“Even though we’re testing now, once you actually have the system up, you don’t know what the bugs will be,” said Amy Fauver, spokeswoman for Cover Oregon, the state agency implementing the law there.
In California, which has the nation’s largest uninsured population, health officials have begun hinting that they may have a similar problem.
“It’s a complex system, and there’s a lot of navigation that needs to happen,” said Oscar Hidalgo, a spokesman for Covered California. He said the agency will know by early September whether the system will be ready in time.
If not, he said, customers will still be able to log on to the Web site and peruse insurance plans and view prices. When they get to the final step, however, they will not be able to sign up. They will have to contact a customer service representative to complete the final enrollment step.
Officials with the District of Columbia’s Health Link decided to put off building a Spanish version of its Web site until later this year, giving its staff bandwidth to complete other tasks they see more critical to the launch.
Until then, the District will have bilingual call-center workers and in-person helpers who will be able to help Spanish speakers navigate the site.
The hiccups are troubling to advocates, who worry that there will be mistakes that result in people being erroneously rejected by Medicaid or denied subsidies to which they are entitled. They are concerned that impediments will discourage the uninsured from signing up for coverage.
“There will be something up and running, but there will be serious, serious difficulties with it” that could result in delays and errors initially, said Robert H. Bonthius Jr., a lawyer at the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland. “It’s an extremely ambitious program, well-intentioned, that is going to be very difficult to accomplish, and it’s going to be months and maybe years before it really gets sorted out.”
With a key deadline approaching, state officials across the country are scrambling to get the Affordable Care Act’s complex computer systems up and running, reviewing contingency plans and, in some places, preparing for delays.
Oct. 1 is the scheduled launch date for the health-care law’s insurance marketplaces — online sites where uninsured people will be able to shop for coverage, sometimes using a government subsidy to purchase a plan. An estimated 7 million people are expected to use these portals to purchase health coverage in 2014.
See how the states have sided on some of the key provisions of the Affordable Care Act:
The task is unprecedented in its complexity, requiring state and federal data systems to transmit reams of information between one another. Some officials in charge of setting up the systems say that the tight deadlines have forced them to take shortcuts when it comes to testing and that some of the bells and whistles will not be ready.
“There’s a certain level of panic about how much needs to be accomplished but a general sense that the bare minimum to get the system functional will be done,” said Matt Salo, executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors. “It will by no means be as smooth and as seamless as people expected.”
Oregon announced this month that it will delay consumers’ direct access to its marketplace, opening the Web site only to brokers and consumer-assistance agents in order to shield consumers from opening-day glitches.
“Even though we’re testing now, once you actually have the system up, you don’t know what the bugs will be,” said Amy Fauver, spokeswoman for Cover Oregon, the state agency implementing the law there.
In California, which has the nation’s largest uninsured population, health officials have begun hinting that they may have a similar problem.
“It’s a complex system, and there’s a lot of navigation that needs to happen,” said Oscar Hidalgo, a spokesman for Covered California. He said the agency will know by early September whether the system will be ready in time.
If not, he said, customers will still be able to log on to the Web site and peruse insurance plans and view prices. When they get to the final step, however, they will not be able to sign up. They will have to contact a customer service representative to complete the final enrollment step.
Officials with the District of Columbia’s Health Link decided to put off building a Spanish version of its Web site until later this year, giving its staff bandwidth to complete other tasks they see more critical to the launch.
Until then, the District will have bilingual call-center workers and in-person helpers who will be able to help Spanish speakers navigate the site.
The hiccups are troubling to advocates, who worry that there will be mistakes that result in people being erroneously rejected by Medicaid or denied subsidies to which they are entitled. They are concerned that impediments will discourage the uninsured from signing up for coverage.
“There will be something up and running, but there will be serious, serious difficulties with it” that could result in delays and errors initially, said Robert H. Bonthius Jr., a lawyer at the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland. “It’s an extremely ambitious program, well-intentioned, that is going to be very difficult to accomplish, and it’s going to be months and maybe years before it really gets sorted out.”
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http://allplanhealthinsurance.com

What is Coming with Your Health Insurance Between Now and January 1!

Just Practical Information On What is Coming with Your Health Insurance Between Now and January 1!

08.12.2013
This is not an editorial. Today’s post is simply non-political, practical information regarding coming changes in health insurance between now and 2016 and beyond. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is law and is on schedule to be fully implemented (for all but groups of 50+) January 1, 2014. For this reason it is my responsibility to inform my clients – and followers of this blog – of what they can expect in the coming months. Specifically, their insurance options and the mechanics involved in transitioning to health plans that provide minimum “essential benefits” that are in compliance with the PPACA. In this post, I will be addressing individuals and families which includes the self-employed and those who have a personal policy because their employer does not provide coverage. All others, including those covered by group plans for less than 50 employees will be addressed in subsequent posts.
First – those of you who currently have a personal or family policy will be allowed to keep your policy until your policy anniversary in 2014. You should check your anniversary date or–if you are my client–call me. Many companies have changed your anniversary date to December 1. This allows you to keep your current plan until December 1, 2014. After that, you must convert to a health care “compliant” plan which will be described below. I can simplify and assist you in this process when the time comes.
If you do not currently have health insurance you must purchase a health policy to be effective January 1 or pay a penalty on your tax return for 2014 and beyond. Another reason you may want to purchase a plan is if you have previously been unable to acquire a policy which covers your pre-existing health condition(s). Your new compliant plan must cover them and health issues will not factor into your cost.
When October 1 arrives (the earliest date you may apply for compliant coverage) I will provide you a link where you will enter your estimated income for 2014. It will instantly tell you whether you qualify for a subsidy. If you do – you are going to want to choose from and apply for plan options in your state health insurance exchange. If your state has not established a state exchange (as is the case in Texas) – you will select from plans in the Federal Health Insurance Exchange. If you do not qualify for a subsidy (which is the case if your income is 400% or greater than the Federal Poverty Level*) – you are probably going to choose a policy offered outside an exchange and direct from an insurance company. The reason being, it is anticipated these plans will offer the same benefits at a lower cost. I can assist you with this option as well.
Below, I will offer further and detailed information on exchanges, plan options and more. Please do not hesitate to call me for clarification or to discuss this information.

Admin. – Kenton Henry

*
FEDERAL POVERTY LEVEL GUIDELINES 2013
http://allplanhealthinsurance.com
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STEP 1:
Note these key dates and deadlines in your calendar:
If your employer offers health insurance, get key dates from your HR department. These are key dates if you’re planning to buy health care through your state’s Marketplace, which is available through a web site, a call, or an in-person visit.
• Oct. 1, 2013: First day you can enroll in a health plan on your state’s Marketplace
• Dec. 31, 2013: Last day you can enroll in a health plan and have your coverage start Jan. 1, 2014
• Jan. 1, 2014: First day you have insurance coverage if you buy a plan in the Marketplace — if, of course, you buy before this date
• March 31, 2014: The last date you can enroll in a plan on your state’s Marketplace to be covered for part of 2014
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Requirements:
* Be a citizen or legal resident.
• Buy your coverage through your state’s or Federal new health insurance Marketplace, also called an “Exchange”.
• Make about $11,490 to $45,960 a year if you are single – or $23,550 to $94,200 a year if you are in a family of four.
If you make less than the lowest amount, you may be eligible for Medicaid. Medicaid will cost you less than you’d save with a tax credit.
Unfortunately, if your state is not expanding Medicaid based on the guidelines in the Affordable Care Act, you may not be able to enroll in Medicaid or be able to get a tax credit. It’s possible that if you make less than $11,490 in 2013, which is the poverty level, you may not qualify for Medicaid if you live in a state that isn’t expanding Medicaid.
In general, you’re not eligible for the tax credits if you could get coverage through a workplace. However, the coverage offered by your employer must be considered affordable. If your company offers a plan that costs more than 9.5% of your income, or that does not cover at least 60% of the cost of covered benefits, you can look for a more affordable plan through your state’s Marketplace and may receive tax credits to lower your costs.
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Insurance Exchanges
State Didn’t Set Up a Marketplace? Relax
You may have heard that not all states will have their own health insurance Marketplace, also called an Exchange. If your state doesn’t set up a Marketplace, what does that mean for you?
Rest assured that no matter which state you live in, you can buy insurance through a Marketplace starting October 2013.
The way you use the Marketplace will be similar in every state. You’ll access a web site, or call, or see someone in person. And you’ll have tools to compare health plans.
But Marketplaces won’t all be the same in every state. There are three ways your state’s Marketplace can be managed — and this affects your choice of health plans and coverage.
1) State-run Marketplaces
Seventeen states are creating their own Marketplaces. These states will have a lot of local control.
Each state will decide which insurance companies can sell policies on its Marketplace.
States also choose the core benefits each plan has to offer. They can set extra requirements for health plans, like benefits that are more generous or more affordable limits on your out-of-pocket costs.
The state is also in charge of getting people to use the Marketplace.
*Indiana and Ohio will have their own State Exchange. Residents of these states should call Kenton Henry @ 800.856.6556
2) Partnerships Between a State and the Government
A few states are teaming up with the federal government to develop Marketplaces.
The federal government:
• Sets up the Marketplace web site and in-person sites
• Decides which health plans will be sold in the partner state
• Sets the benefit levels
• Runs the Marketplace
The states:
• Monitor health plans
• Help people find the best insurance for their needs *(Call Kenton Henry @ 800.856.6556)
• Handle complaints
Federal-run Marketplaces
Some states decided not to set up their own Marketplaces. In those states, the federal government will step in to run the marketplaces directly. It will make all the decisions: how the Marketplace will work, what plans are sold, and how to promote the Marketplace. Each state is considered separately and has its own Marketplace web site. (Texas residents call Kenton Henry @ 800.856.6556)
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Your Insurance Choices in a Marketplace: FAQ

A health insuranceMarketplace, also known as an Exchange, is a one-stop shop for affordable insurance in your state. Your state’s Marketplace has tools to make it easy for you to compare your choices and pick the best for your needs.
On a state Marketplace site, health plans are grouped by levels of coverage — how much the plan will pay for your health care and what services are covered.
Each level is named after a type of metal:
• Bronze
• Silver
• Gold
• Platinum
Bronze plans offer the least coverage and platinum plans offer the most.
How do the bronze, silver, gold, and platinum levels differ?
The metal plans vary by the percentage of costs you have to pay on average toward the health care you receive.
Here are the percentages of health care costs you pay for each type of plan:
• Bronze plan: 40%
• Silver plan: 30%
• Gold plan: 20%
• Platinum plan: 10% of your health care costs.
The way you pay your portion of these costs is in deductibles and copayments or co-insurance.
In general, the more you are willing and able to pay each time for health care service or a prescription, the lower your premium. A premium is your monthly payment to have insurance.
As an example, when you compare the bronze and platinum plans:
With a bronze plan: You pay the most each time you see your doctor or get a medicine. This is also called having higher “out-of-pocket” costs. But in a bronze plan you pay the least premium each month.
With a platinum plan: You pay the least each time you see your doctor or get a medicine. But in a platinum plan you pay the highest premium each month.
How does coverage from a metal plan compare to my current insurance?
The bronze through platinum coverage levels are new. So you probably don’t know how the benefits of the plan you use today compare to them. The coverage level you have now depends on whether you bought your plan:
• From an employer: Your coverage level is likely between a gold and platinum level.
• On your own: Your coverage level is likely between a bronze and silver level.
Having a sense of how the insurance you’re used to compares with the new plans will help you decide on a plan. You should compare the out-of pocket costs you are currently paying, the services provided (including prescription drugs), and anticipated changes in your health.
If you shop for insurance on your state’s Marketplace, you’ll see the health plans organized in this way:
• 1st by metal level: Bronze, silver, gold, or platinum
• 2nd by brand, such as Blue Cross, Cigna, Humana, Kaiser, United, and others
• 3rd by type of health plan, such as HMO, PPO, POS, or high-deductible plans with a health savings account.
The type of health plan affects how much choice you have in providers, the amount of paperwork you have, and your out-of-pocket costs.
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Tax Penalty At-a-Glance: Who Will Pay The Penalty & How Much Is It?
By law, you need to have health insurance by 2014. If you already get insurance through your employer or your partner’s employer, you’re all set. But what happens if you don’t follow this requirement from the Affordable Care Act?
If you can afford health insurance and don’t buy it, you’ll pay a fine when you file your 2013 income taxes in April 2014.
For the first year of the new law, 2014, the fine for not having insurance is the lowest it will be. After that, it goes up steeply in 2015 and again in 2016.
In 2014: There are two ways the government calculates what you owe. You have to pay whichever amount is higher.
• One way is to charge you $95 for each adult and $47.50 for each child, but not more than $285 total per family.
• The other way is to fine you 1% of your family income. If your family makes $50,000 a year, the fine will be $500.
In 2015: There will still be two ways to calculate what you owe. You have to pay whichever amount is higher.
• One way is to charge you $325 for each adult and $162.50 for each child, but no more than $975 total per family.
• The other way is 2% of your family income. If your family makes $50,000 a year, the fine will be $1,000.
In 2016 and beyond: There will still be two ways to calculate what you owe. You have to pay whichever amount is higher.
• One way is to charge you $695 for each adult and $347.50 for each child, but no more than $2,085 per family.
• The other calculation is 2.5% of your family income. If your family makes $50,000 a year, the fine will be $1,250.


http://allplanhealthinsurance.com

Can we really say we didn’t see the cuts to Medicare Part B coming? (These are described in the Houston Chronicle, our feature article below.) Last year the administration made the decision to cut $716 billion from Medicare over the next ten years. $156 billion of this is predicted to come from Medicare Advantage. If you are a Medicare Advantage policyholder, did this news somehow fail to appear in your “Annual Notice of Change” which arrived last October? If so–could this be because we were in the middle of a Presidential election and cuts to your Medicare Advantage Plan might not have helped someone’s re-election? Fortunately for me, I have always encouraged my clients to enroll in Medicare Supplement to fill in their gaps in Medicare if it was at all affordable.
Admin. – Kenton Henry

*OBAMACARE CUTS

****************************************************
Feature Article:
Houston Chronicle Medicare Part B, life and death
By Michael Hazel | July 19, 2013 | Updated: July 21, 2013 7:04pm
Across Texas, seniors with serious medical conditions could soon lose access to the medical treatments they need.
Right now, in an effort to trim federal spending, lawmakers are considering cuts to Medicare Part B, the component of Medicare that covers cancer treatments and other medicines that are administered by physicians. Lawmakers must reject this proposal and work to balance the budget without restricting access to medical care.
Under Medicare Part B, health care providers purchase drugs that require administration by the provider and are later reimbursed by Medicare, after administering the treatments in their office, according to a preset formula.
For almost a decade, physicians have been reimbursed the average sales price (ASP) of each medicine plus an additional 6 percent. That extra 6 percent helps to cover costs related to the shipping, handling and storage of the drugs, in addition to health care providers’ other overhead and administrative costs.
The federal “sequester,” which took effect in April, has in effect reduced Medicare Part B’s payment formula for drugs from ASP, plus 6 percent, to ASP, plus 4 percent. Now, some lawmakers want to cut that reimbursement rate even further. Such reductions could mean big problems for Medicare patients.
Medicare patients in Texas are understandably worried. John Peterson, a patient at Texas Oncology who’s been battling leukemia for 12 years, is concerned about future treatments. “I have a lot of exotic drugs that we have Medicare pick up the cost … it’s been a life saver,” Peterson told News Channel 25 in Waco. He fears Part B reductions will make continuing treatments at his current cancer center impossible.
Such reservations are not unfounded. Further Medicare Part B cuts could very well force cancer clinics to start closing. According to the Community Oncology Alliance, approximately 240 oncology clinics have closed in the past four and a half years and another 400 are struggling financially.
“Without adequate reimbursement, providers will close their doors, forcing patients to either forgo treatment or be relocated to inpatient facilities, many outside their communities or region,” reports the National Patient Advocate Foundation.
Such closures are particularly problematic in states like Texas, because our state is home to so many rural residents. With fewer community clinics available, rural Texans will have to travel far distances to other centers or hospitals for treatment. For those suffering from life-threatening illnesses, unnecessary travel is exactly what they should be avoiding.
Treating patients in hospitals instead of doctors’ offices is also far more expensive. Milliman, a respected actuarial firm, found that a chemotherapy patient who receives treatment at a hospital costs Medicare about $600 more per month than a patient who is seen at a physician’s office.
For Texans like John Peterson, Medicare Part B is a matter of life and death. It’s unacceptable that politicians in Washington are considering further reductions to the program’s payments for Part B drugs.
Texas’ representatives should make certain that patients can continue to access the medical care they need.

Michael Hazel is the incoming president of Texas Nurse Practitioners.


http://allplanhealthinsurance.com

Health Insurance Premiums To Increase 72% in State Exchange

07.19.2013

So much for the “affordable” part of the Affordable Care Act. At least in some states, like Indiana, where along with Texas and Ohio, I have many clients. As October 1st winds nearer, the date when the Federal and State Health Insurance Exchanges must unveil the new health care compliant policies for 2014 that individuals, families and small groups must choose from – it is evident costs will skyrocket. According to the Indiana Department of Insurance rates there will increase 72%! (See Feature Article below.) In Texas–which is one of 34 states which elected not to establish a state exchange–the Federal Exchange will be the (default) exchange from which to elect coverage. It’s premiums are yet to be revealed but are predicted to be at least 30% higher than for those who currently have health insurance in Texas.

In conclusion, if you do not qualify for a federal subsidy for at least a portion of your coverage–prepare yourself for a significant rate increase. What does it take to qualify for a subsidy? Your annual reportable income must be less than 400% of the Federal Poverty Limit. *Refer to the chart below that limit, increasing increments and the accompanying subsidy.

Admin. – Kenton Henry

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FEATURED ARTICLE:

In Indiana, Individual Health Insurance to Cost 72% More Due to Obamacare

8:15 AM, Jul 19, 2013 • By DANIEL HALPER

Obamacare will be costly for Hoosiers who already have health insurance, according to a report from Indystar.com.

“Insurance rates in Indiana will increase 72 percent for those with individual plans and 8 percent for small group plans under President Barack Obama’s healthcare overhaul, according to the state’s insurance department,” reads the report.

“The spike in costs is due primarily to new mandates under the law, which requires insurers to cover those with pre-existing conditions and to offer a minimum level of benefits, said Logan Harrison, chief deputy commissioner with the Indiana Department of Insurance under Republican Gov. Mike Pence. New taxes and fees under the law also contributed, Harrison said.

The Indiana governor tells the paper: “This new data regrettably confirms the negative impact of the Affordable Care Act on the insurance market in Indiana. … The Affordable Care Act requires many Hoosiers to purchase more comprehensive and more expensive health insurance than they may want or need. These rates call into question just how affordable health insurance will really be for many Hoosiers.”

Costs for individual plans is expected to increase from an average of $255 per member per month in 2012 to $570 in 2014, when the most aspects of the law go into effect.

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*2013 Federal Poverty Guidelines



48 Contiguous States and DC

Note: The 100% column shows the federal poverty level for each family size, and the percentage columns that follow represent income levels that are commonly used as guidelines for health programs.

 Household   Size

 100%

 133%

 150%

200%

 300%

400%

 1

$11,490

$15,282

$17,235

$22,980

$34,470

$45,960

 2

15,510

 20,628

23,265

  31,020

46,530

62,040

 3

19,530

 25,975

29,295

  39,060

58,590

78,120

 4

23,550

 31,322

35,325

  47,100

70,650

94,200

 5

27,570

 36,668

41,355

  55,140

82,710

110,280

 6

31,590

 42,015

47,385

  63,180

94,770

126,360

 7

35,610

 47,361

53,415

  71,220

106,830

142,440

 8

39,630

 52,708

59,445

  79,260

118,890

158,520

 For   each additional person, add

$4,020

 $5,347

$6,030

  $8,040

$12,060

$16,080


Alaska

 Household Size

 100%

    133%

 150%

200%

 300%

 400%

 1

$14,350

$19,086

$21,525

$28,700

$43,050

$57,400

 2

19,380

25,775

29,070

38,760

58,140

77,520

 3

24,410

32,465

36,615

48,820

73,230

97,640

 4

29,440

39,155

44,160

58,880

88,320

117,760

 5

34,470

45,845

51,705

68,940

103,410

137,880

 6

39,500

52,535

59,250

79,000

118,500

158,000

 7

44,530

59,225

66,795

89,060

133,590

178,120

 8

49,560

65,915

74,340

99,120

148,680

198,240

 For   each additional person, add

$5,030

$6,690

$7,545

$10,060

$15,090

$20,120


Hawaii

 Household   Size

 100%

 133%

  150%

 200%

 300%

 400%

 1

$13,230

$17,596

$19,845

$26,460

$39,690

$52,920

 2

17,850

23,741

26,775

35,700

53,550

71,400

 3

22,470

29,885

33,705

44,940

67,410

89,880

 4

27,090

36,030

40,635

54,180

81,270

108,360

 5

31,710

42,174

47,565

63,420

95,130

126,840

 6

36,330

48,319

54,495

72,660

108,990

145,320

 7

40,950

54,464

61,425

81,900

122,850

163,800

 8

45,570

60,608

68,355

91,140

136,710

182,280

 For   each additional person, add

$4,620

$6,145

$6,930

$9,240

$13,860

$18,480

Source: Calculations by Families USA based on data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Courtesy of All Med & Life Quote

http://allplanhealthinsurance.com

http://allplaninsurance.com