Can we really say we didn’t see the cuts to Medicare Part B coming? (These are described in the Houston Chronicle, our feature article below.) Last year the administration made the decision to cut $716 billion from Medicare over the next ten years. $156 billion of this is predicted to come from Medicare Advantage. If you are a Medicare Advantage policyholder, did this news somehow fail to appear in your “Annual Notice of Change” which arrived last October? If so–could this be because we were in the middle of a Presidential election and cuts to your Medicare Advantage Plan might not have helped someone’s re-election? Fortunately for me, I have always encouraged my clients to enroll in Medicare Supplement to fill in their gaps in Medicare if it was at all affordable.
Admin. – Kenton Henry

*OBAMACARE CUTS

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Feature Article:
Houston Chronicle Medicare Part B, life and death
By Michael Hazel | July 19, 2013 | Updated: July 21, 2013 7:04pm
Across Texas, seniors with serious medical conditions could soon lose access to the medical treatments they need.
Right now, in an effort to trim federal spending, lawmakers are considering cuts to Medicare Part B, the component of Medicare that covers cancer treatments and other medicines that are administered by physicians. Lawmakers must reject this proposal and work to balance the budget without restricting access to medical care.
Under Medicare Part B, health care providers purchase drugs that require administration by the provider and are later reimbursed by Medicare, after administering the treatments in their office, according to a preset formula.
For almost a decade, physicians have been reimbursed the average sales price (ASP) of each medicine plus an additional 6 percent. That extra 6 percent helps to cover costs related to the shipping, handling and storage of the drugs, in addition to health care providers’ other overhead and administrative costs.
The federal “sequester,” which took effect in April, has in effect reduced Medicare Part B’s payment formula for drugs from ASP, plus 6 percent, to ASP, plus 4 percent. Now, some lawmakers want to cut that reimbursement rate even further. Such reductions could mean big problems for Medicare patients.
Medicare patients in Texas are understandably worried. John Peterson, a patient at Texas Oncology who’s been battling leukemia for 12 years, is concerned about future treatments. “I have a lot of exotic drugs that we have Medicare pick up the cost … it’s been a life saver,” Peterson told News Channel 25 in Waco. He fears Part B reductions will make continuing treatments at his current cancer center impossible.
Such reservations are not unfounded. Further Medicare Part B cuts could very well force cancer clinics to start closing. According to the Community Oncology Alliance, approximately 240 oncology clinics have closed in the past four and a half years and another 400 are struggling financially.
“Without adequate reimbursement, providers will close their doors, forcing patients to either forgo treatment or be relocated to inpatient facilities, many outside their communities or region,” reports the National Patient Advocate Foundation.
Such closures are particularly problematic in states like Texas, because our state is home to so many rural residents. With fewer community clinics available, rural Texans will have to travel far distances to other centers or hospitals for treatment. For those suffering from life-threatening illnesses, unnecessary travel is exactly what they should be avoiding.
Treating patients in hospitals instead of doctors’ offices is also far more expensive. Milliman, a respected actuarial firm, found that a chemotherapy patient who receives treatment at a hospital costs Medicare about $600 more per month than a patient who is seen at a physician’s office.
For Texans like John Peterson, Medicare Part B is a matter of life and death. It’s unacceptable that politicians in Washington are considering further reductions to the program’s payments for Part B drugs.
Texas’ representatives should make certain that patients can continue to access the medical care they need.

Michael Hazel is the incoming president of Texas Nurse Practitioners.


http://allplanhealthinsurance.com

Health Insurance Premiums To Increase 72% in State Exchange

07.19.2013

So much for the “affordable” part of the Affordable Care Act. At least in some states, like Indiana, where along with Texas and Ohio, I have many clients. As October 1st winds nearer, the date when the Federal and State Health Insurance Exchanges must unveil the new health care compliant policies for 2014 that individuals, families and small groups must choose from – it is evident costs will skyrocket. According to the Indiana Department of Insurance rates there will increase 72%! (See Feature Article below.) In Texas–which is one of 34 states which elected not to establish a state exchange–the Federal Exchange will be the (default) exchange from which to elect coverage. It’s premiums are yet to be revealed but are predicted to be at least 30% higher than for those who currently have health insurance in Texas.

In conclusion, if you do not qualify for a federal subsidy for at least a portion of your coverage–prepare yourself for a significant rate increase. What does it take to qualify for a subsidy? Your annual reportable income must be less than 400% of the Federal Poverty Limit. *Refer to the chart below that limit, increasing increments and the accompanying subsidy.

Admin. – Kenton Henry

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FEATURED ARTICLE:

In Indiana, Individual Health Insurance to Cost 72% More Due to Obamacare

8:15 AM, Jul 19, 2013 • By DANIEL HALPER

Obamacare will be costly for Hoosiers who already have health insurance, according to a report from Indystar.com.

“Insurance rates in Indiana will increase 72 percent for those with individual plans and 8 percent for small group plans under President Barack Obama’s healthcare overhaul, according to the state’s insurance department,” reads the report.

“The spike in costs is due primarily to new mandates under the law, which requires insurers to cover those with pre-existing conditions and to offer a minimum level of benefits, said Logan Harrison, chief deputy commissioner with the Indiana Department of Insurance under Republican Gov. Mike Pence. New taxes and fees under the law also contributed, Harrison said.

The Indiana governor tells the paper: “This new data regrettably confirms the negative impact of the Affordable Care Act on the insurance market in Indiana. … The Affordable Care Act requires many Hoosiers to purchase more comprehensive and more expensive health insurance than they may want or need. These rates call into question just how affordable health insurance will really be for many Hoosiers.”

Costs for individual plans is expected to increase from an average of $255 per member per month in 2012 to $570 in 2014, when the most aspects of the law go into effect.

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*2013 Federal Poverty Guidelines



48 Contiguous States and DC

Note: The 100% column shows the federal poverty level for each family size, and the percentage columns that follow represent income levels that are commonly used as guidelines for health programs.

 Household   Size

 100%

 133%

 150%

200%

 300%

400%

 1

$11,490

$15,282

$17,235

$22,980

$34,470

$45,960

 2

15,510

 20,628

23,265

  31,020

46,530

62,040

 3

19,530

 25,975

29,295

  39,060

58,590

78,120

 4

23,550

 31,322

35,325

  47,100

70,650

94,200

 5

27,570

 36,668

41,355

  55,140

82,710

110,280

 6

31,590

 42,015

47,385

  63,180

94,770

126,360

 7

35,610

 47,361

53,415

  71,220

106,830

142,440

 8

39,630

 52,708

59,445

  79,260

118,890

158,520

 For   each additional person, add

$4,020

 $5,347

$6,030

  $8,040

$12,060

$16,080


Alaska

 Household Size

 100%

    133%

 150%

200%

 300%

 400%

 1

$14,350

$19,086

$21,525

$28,700

$43,050

$57,400

 2

19,380

25,775

29,070

38,760

58,140

77,520

 3

24,410

32,465

36,615

48,820

73,230

97,640

 4

29,440

39,155

44,160

58,880

88,320

117,760

 5

34,470

45,845

51,705

68,940

103,410

137,880

 6

39,500

52,535

59,250

79,000

118,500

158,000

 7

44,530

59,225

66,795

89,060

133,590

178,120

 8

49,560

65,915

74,340

99,120

148,680

198,240

 For   each additional person, add

$5,030

$6,690

$7,545

$10,060

$15,090

$20,120


Hawaii

 Household   Size

 100%

 133%

  150%

 200%

 300%

 400%

 1

$13,230

$17,596

$19,845

$26,460

$39,690

$52,920

 2

17,850

23,741

26,775

35,700

53,550

71,400

 3

22,470

29,885

33,705

44,940

67,410

89,880

 4

27,090

36,030

40,635

54,180

81,270

108,360

 5

31,710

42,174

47,565

63,420

95,130

126,840

 6

36,330

48,319

54,495

72,660

108,990

145,320

 7

40,950

54,464

61,425

81,900

122,850

163,800

 8

45,570

60,608

68,355

91,140

136,710

182,280

 For   each additional person, add

$4,620

$6,145

$6,930

$9,240

$13,860

$18,480

Source: Calculations by Families USA based on data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Courtesy of All Med & Life Quote

http://allplanhealthinsurance.com

http://allplaninsurance.com